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Prepositions > Prepositions of Time: at, in, on


We use:
• at for a PRECISE TIME
• in for MONTHS, YEARS, CENTURIES and LONG PERIODS
• on for DAYS and DATES

atinon
PRECISE TIMEMONTHS, YEARS, CENTURIES and LONG PERIODSDAYS and DATES
at 5 o'clockin Mayon Sunday
at 12.30 amin summeron Tuesdays
at noonin the summeron 28 March
at midnightin 2004on 25 Dec. 2010
at bedtimein the 1980son Christmas Day
at sunrisein the next centuryon Independence Day
at sunseton my birthday
at the momentin the past/futureon New Year's Eve


In informal style we sometimes leave out 'on':
I'm looking forward to seeing him Saturday evening.

Plurals are used to talk about repeated actions:
In some offices, employees are allowed to wear less formal attire on Fridays, known as Casual Friday or Dress-Down Friday.

American people say on the weekend; British people say at the weekend!
What are you going to do on the weekend (AmE) / at the weekend (BE)?

We do not usually use expressions of time at / on / in before next, last, that, this, every, each, all and some.
I heard it this morning on the radio.
We met every evening before dinner.
You can call me any time you like.


Some examples:

We are going to a party on New Year’s Eve.
John and Sally often go out in the evening.
See you on Monday morning.
We always go to town to do some shopping on Saturday. It is the only time we can.
The last train goes at midnight so we had better get going.









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